Tamil Nadu CM Stalin constitutes one-member committee to study new criminal laws, recommend amendments

Various Opposition parties including Congress had claimed that the three new criminal laws were passed “forcibly”.

BySouth First Desk

Published Jul 08, 2024 | 6:38 PM Updated Jul 08, 2024 | 6:38 PM

Stalin constitutes one-member committee to study new criminal laws, recommend amendments

Tamil Nadu Chief Minister MK Stalin, on Monday, 8 July constituted a one-member committee headed by retired Justice M Satyanarayanan to study the new criminal laws and recommend amendments to be made at the state level.

The recommendations for the changes to be made in the three criminal laws enacted by the Union government would also include changing the name of the laws, which are currently in Hindi.

Justice M Satyanarayanan-led committee is expected to submit its report within a month after a thorough consultation with advocate associations and other stakeholders.

The three new criminal laws – Bharatiya Nyaya Sanhita (BNS), Bharatiya Nagrik Suraksha Sanhita (BNSS) and Bharatiya Sakshya Adhiniyam (BSA) – came into force on 1 July and replaced the Indian Penal Code (IPC), the Evidence Act of 1872 and the Code of Criminal Procedure 1973 respectively.

Tamil Nadu CM Stalin’s decision to constitute a one-member committee comes amid protests and agitations being held in Tamil Nadu and across the country against the various sections of the three laws.

Various Opposition parties including Congress have claimed that the three new criminal laws were passed “forcibly” and that the INDIA bloc will not allow such “bulldozer justice” to prevail in the country’s parliamentary system.

The laws have been criticised for being passed without much debate in the Parliament. The Union government passed the bills in the Parliament in December  after a record 146 MPs were suspended from Lok Sabha.

In a letter dated 17 June to Union Home Minister Amit Shah, Stalin had pointed out the problems in these new laws and said that some of the basic clauses of the laws are flawed and have been enacted without taking full feedback from the state governments.

Related: Old vs new: Get ready for India’s ‘parallel’ judicial system from today

(Edited by Neena)

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